Mechanistic insights into Okinawan longevity diet: Consuming ample amounts of Sweet potatoes will extend your lifespan: Sweet potato-derived compounds function as longevity promoters: ß-carotene, derived from sweet potatoes, may  increase insulin sensitivity, slow down cardiac aging, increase regeneration of tissues, and increase lifespan, via up-regulation of BubR1 and others genes, 11/December/2019, 6.58 am

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 What they say: Introduction: 

A recent study from the Department of Genetics, Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Biological Mechanisms of Aging Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; and Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia shows that “Sirtuin-2 induces the checkpoint kinase BubR1 to increase lifespan.” This study was published, in the 12 May  2014 issue of the journal  “EMBO”, by Prof Sinclair PhD, North BJ, and others.


What we say: 

On the foundation of this interesting finding, Dr L Boominathan PhD, Director-cum-chief Scientist of GBMDreports that: Mechanistic insights into Okinawan longevity diet: Consuming ample amounts of Sweet potatoes will extend your lifespan: Sweet potato-derived compounds function as longevity promoters: ß-carotene, derived from sweet potatoes, may  increase insulin sensitivity, slow down cardiac aging, increase regeneration of tissues, and increase lifespan, via up-regulation of BubR1 and others genes


From research findings to Therapeutic Opportunity: 

Although 70% of Okinawan longevity diet, consumed by long-lived people from an island in Japan, Okinawa, consists only of Sweet potatoits mechanism of action remains elusive. Besides,  people from Bapan, a region from China, who live past hundred years in great health, consume nearly half-a-kilo of a sweet potato every day. However, how increased consumption of sweet potato may aid in extending the lifespan, mechanistically, is not clear up until now. 

This study suggests, for the first time, that Sweet potatoderived compounds function as longevity-promoters. ß-caroteneby increasing the expression of its target gene, it could: (a) increase the expression of BuBR1 (BUB1 Mitotic Checkpoint Serine/Threonine Kinase); (b) decrease the expression of p70 S6 Kinase, and (c) regulate the expression of a number of longevity-promoting molecules (fig. 1). Thereby, it may: (1) increase insulin sensitivity; (2) attenuate cognitive impairment; (3) delay diseases of aging; (4) slow down cardiac aging; (5) promote resistance to bone, immune and motor dysfunction; (6) promote tissue & cell rejuvenation; and (7) prolong median lifespan.

Figure 1.  Mechanistic insights into how ß-carotene, derived from sweet potato, functions as a longevity promoter. ß-carotene may extend mammalian lifespan via up-regulation of BuBR1 and other genes; and down-regulation of other genes.

 

Figure 2. ß-carotene, derived from Sweet potato, functions as a longevity-promoter through induction of BuBR1 & the suppression of the aging process.

Figure 3. How does ß-carotene promote longevity and function as an anti-aging agent? Nearly 3/4th of Okinawa longevity diet consists only of Sweet potato. Sweet potato is enriched with ß-carotene (8.5 mg per 100g of sweet potato). ß-carotene could function as a longevity-promoter through the induction of BuBR1 and other genes.

Figure 4. Why Japan has the highest number of centenarians; and how the increased consumption of Sweet potato aids in lifespan extension. ß-carotene, derived from Sweet potato,  attenuates the aging process and extends longevity through induction of BuBR1 and other longevity genes.

Figure 4.  Okinawa longevity diet. The Okinawan diet depicted above highlights 70% of it consists only of sweet potatoes.

Figure 5.  While it had been shown that overexpression of mitotic checkpoint kinase gene BuBR1 extends lifespan and attenuates aging in mice, its precise mechanism of action remains largely unknown.  This study presented here suggests, for the first time, that Sweet potato-derived compounds, such as ß-carotene, by upregulating the expression of BuBR1 (figs.1-4) and other genes, it could extend lifespan and attenuate aging.

Thus, a pharmaceutical mixture encompassing ß-carotene, either alone or in combination with other drugs or compounds, may be used to extend the lifespan of an individual (fig.5). Given the mechanistic significance of consumption of longevity medicine sweet potato and its component ß-carotene, its consumption can be increased throughout the world.


Details on the research findings: 

Idea Proposed/Formulated (with experimental evidence) by Dr L Boominathan Ph.D.

Amount: $ 1, 500#

Undisclosed mechanistic information: How ß-carotene increase the expression of BubR1?

Terms & Conditions apply http://genomediscovery.org/registration/terms-and-conditions/

# Research cooperation


References

Web: http://genomediscovery.org or http://newbioideas.com

CitationBoominathan, L., Mechanistic insights into Okinawan longevity diet: Consuming ample amounts of Sweet potatoes will extend your lifespan: Sweet potato-derived compounds function as longevity promoters: ß-carotene, derived from sweet potatoes, may  increase insulin sensitivity, slow down cardiac aging, increase regeneration of tissues, and increase lifespan, via up-regulation of BubR1 and others genes, 11/December/2019, 6.58 am,  Genome-2-Bio-Medicine Discovery center (GBMD), http://genomediscovery.org

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